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Scientists note novel rice-growing method


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#1 Fritz

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 02:46 PM

Manila Bulletin

Scientists note novel rice-growing method
By MARVYN N. BENANING
November 3, 2011, 6:12pm

MANILA, Philippines — Scientists testing the propriety of the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) have noted that it provides higher output for practically all rice varieties.

As of last count, there were 200,000 varieties of rice on the planet, excluding the genetically-modified (GM) strains like Golden Rice.

Writing for the March 2011 issue of the journal of Paddy and Water Management, Norman Uphoff, Amir Kassam and Richard Hardwood cited the use of SRI in traditional varieties like riz rouge (red rice) in Madagascar that yielded upwards of 30 percent.

SRI itself was actually developed for hybrids and even GM strains in a bid to increase yield and provide more grains for the people of Madagascar.

Developed intensively in Madagascar by the French Jesuit priest Fr. Henri de Laulanie nearly 30 years ago after decades of observation, SRI has been tested in 42 countries with no negative results.

What prompted SRI to shift to inorganic fertilizer, Uphoff, Kassam and Harwood said, was “when the Madagascar government removed fertilizer subsidies in the late 1980s.”

Necessity being the mother of invention, this led to the use of compost as an alternative and the farmers were surprised that their yields went up, much higher than when they used SRI and inorganic fertilizer.

This may well be the case in the Philippines since the Department of Agriculture (DA) has clamped down on fertilizer and seed subsidies and plunged headlong into a campaign to achieve rice self-sufficiency two years hence.

Uphoff comes from Cornell University and Kassam works for the University of Reading in the United Kingdom. Harwood is professor emeritus at the Michigan State University.

What is surprising to SRI is that it was not developed from top-to-bottom but from the bottom-to-the-top, with field experience contributing to a scientific understanding of the system, the authors said.

The national coordinator for SRI in the Philippines, Roberto Verzola, said the system is unlike the package of innovations presented by the Green Revolution since the method allows for variations and specific practices based on the basic principles developed in Madagascar.

For starters, he said farmers can practice SRI through the following simple steps:

• Start with a small plot (between 200 sq m and 500 sq m).

• Add between two and five bags of compost during land preparation.

• When they are between eight and 12-days-old, transplant seedkings on a 25 cm by 24 cm grid, at one seedling per hill.

• Transplant within 30 minutes and avoid any root damage.

• Keep the soil moist, not continually flood, or

• Every 10 days, flood for two to three days and dry for seven to eight days.

Success means doubling the number of tillers per plant, Verzola said, and a larger trial plot can be used for the next season and so on.

“The scientific elements for explaining SRI performance are not really new, although the emphasis that SRI places on the contributions which better root systems and more abundant soil biota can make to crop production is somewhat different from much of the rice science literature,” the authors said.

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#2 beeguy

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 03:09 PM

Manila Bulletin

Scientists note novel rice-growing method
By MARVYN N. BENANING
November 3, 2011, 6:12pm

MANILA, Philippines — Scientists testing the propriety of the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) have noted that it provides higher output for practically all rice varieties.

As of last count, there were 200,000 varieties of rice on the planet, excluding the genetically-modified (GM) strains like Golden Rice.

Writing for the March 2011 issue of the journal of Paddy and Water Management, Norman Uphoff, Amir Kassam and Richard Hardwood cited the use of SRI in traditional varieties like riz rouge (red rice) in Madagascar that yielded upwards of 30 percent.

SRI itself was actually developed for hybrids and even GM strains in a bid to increase yield and provide more grains for the people of Madagascar.

Developed intensively in Madagascar by the French Jesuit priest Fr. Henri de Laulanie nearly 30 years ago after decades of observation, SRI has been tested in 42 countries with no negative results.

What prompted SRI to shift to inorganic fertilizer, Uphoff, Kassam and Harwood said, was "when the Madagascar government removed fertilizer subsidies in the late 1980s."

Necessity being the mother of invention, this led to the use of compost as an alternative and the farmers were surprised that their yields went up, much higher than when they used SRI and inorganic fertilizer.

This may well be the case in the Philippines since the Department of Agriculture (DA) has clamped down on fertilizer and seed subsidies and plunged headlong into a campaign to achieve rice self-sufficiency two years hence.

Uphoff comes from Cornell University and Kassam works for the University of Reading in the United Kingdom. Harwood is professor emeritus at the Michigan State University.

What is surprising to SRI is that it was not developed from top-to-bottom but from the bottom-to-the-top, with field experience contributing to a scientific understanding of the system, the authors said.

The national coordinator for SRI in the Philippines, Roberto Verzola, said the system is unlike the package of innovations presented by the Green Revolution since the method allows for variations and specific practices based on the basic principles developed in Madagascar.

For starters, he said farmers can practice SRI through the following simple steps:

• Start with a small plot (between 200 sq m and 500 sq m).

• Add between two and five bags of compost during land preparation.

• When they are between eight and 12-days-old, transplant seedkings on a 25 cm by 24 cm grid, at one seedling per hill.

• Transplant within 30 minutes and avoid any root damage.

• Keep the soil moist, not continually flood, or

• Every 10 days, flood for two to three days and dry for seven to eight days.

Success means doubling the number of tillers per plant, Verzola said, and a larger trial plot can be used for the next season and so on.

"The scientific elements for explaining SRI performance are not really new, although the emphasis that SRI places on the contributions which better root systems and more abundant soil biota can make to crop production is somewhat different from much of the rice science literature," the authors said.


Probably from returning the conditions to that which rice would have grown without human intervention.

03/02/2010: First trip to the Philippines.
04/06/2010: Joined WOF
04/11/2010: Met on Cherry Blossoms.
05/06/2010: Talked her into joining WOF.
05/13/2010: Changed our statuses on Facebook to "in a relationship".
05/28/2010: Met her friend and her employer in Chicago (here on business).
08/17/2010: Booked trip to the Philippines.
09/05/2010: Arrived in Manila late at night. Met her in the waiting area. WOW!
09/08/2010: Met her parents and most of the family!
09/10/2010: Trekked to the top of Mt. Pinatubo and surprised her with a ring. She said YES!
09/19/2010: Had to return to US. :(
03/25/2011: Arrived second visit with her. Together again.
04/14/2011: Flew back to Chicago :(

K-1
07/25/2011: Starting on K-1 package. Where did I put all that stuff???
08/02/2011: K-1 Petition package mailed via Priority Mail to Texas Service Center! The clock is running...

08/09/2011: K-1 Petition package delivered to Texas Service Center.
08/13/2011: K-1 Petition NOA1 received.
01/11/2012: I129F PETITION FOR FIANCE(E) APPROVED
01/27/2012: NVC notification letter received.
02/07/2012: She received the letter from the US Embassy
02/14/2012: She passed the physical at St. Lukes!
02/15/2012: She finished her CFO seminar
02/27/2012: Depart O'Hare for Manila
02/28/2012: Arrived very late in Manila

03/01/2012: Interview at the US Embassy - K1 VISA APPROVED!!
03/07/2012: Visa delivered!
03/08/2012: Got CFO sticker.

03/16/2012: Arrived in the USA together.

05/12/2012: Married!!!

AOS

05/18/2012: Mailed AOS package to USCIS.
08/10/2012: Received temp Emp Auth Card with Advanced Parole from USCIS.

04/04/2013: Received her Permanent Resident Card from USCIS!

 

Removing Conditions

03/20/2015: Mailed I-751 package to USCIS

03/23/2015: I-751 package arrived at the California Service Center

03/25/2015: I-751 check cashed by USCIS

03/27/2015: I-751 NOA received from USCIS

04/13/2015: Bought tickets to Phil for her brother's wedding in June.

 

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