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U.S. needs arsenic limits in rice: Consumer Reports


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#1 beeguy

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 09:32 PM

U.S. needs arsenic limits in rice: Consumer Report

By Lisa Baertlein and Caroline Humer | Reuters Sept. 19, 2012

LOS ANGELES/NEW YORK (Reuters) - Consumer Reports is urging U.S. limits for arsenic in rice after tests of more than 60 popular products - from Kellogg's Rice Krispies to Gerber infant cereal - showed most contained some level of inorganic arsenic, a known human carcinogen.

The watchdog group said some varieties of brown rice - including brands sold by Whole Foods Markets Inc and Wal-Mart Stores Inc - contained particularly significant levels of inorganic arsenic.

It recommended ways for children and adults to limit their intake of rice products each week and said U.S. regulators should ban arsenic-containing drugs and pesticides used in crop and animal production.

For the full report, see: http://www.consumerr...arsenic1112.htm

"The goal of our report is to inform — not alarm — consumers about the importance of reducing arsenic exposure," said Urvashi Rangan, director of safety and sustainability at Consumer Reports. "The silver lining in all of this is that it is possible to get a better handle on this."

In the absence of government regulation, steps that consumers can take include limiting infant rice cereal to one serving per day for babies and excluding rice milk from the daily diets of children under the age of 5, the report said. Adults should eat no more than two servings of rice per week.

As replacements, it suggested other healthy whole grains such as wheat, corn and oats, which have lower arsenic levels.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Wednesday that it plans to collect data on 1,200 food samples by the end of the year and make its own recommendation on arsenic intake.

The agency said its preliminary data on arsenic in rice products is consistent with the Consumer Reports investigation. It found average levels of inorganic arsenic for various rice products of 3.5 to 6.7 micrograms per serving in about 200 samples. Consumer Reports notes that the most stringent U.S. state restriction on inorganic arsenic in drinking water sets a permissible limit of 5 micrograms in a single liter.

"Our advice right now is that consumers should continue to eat a balanced diet that includes a wide variety of grains - not only for good nutrition, but also to minimize any potential consequences from consuming any one particular food," FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg said in a statement.

Consumers are likely to cut back on rice altogether rather than try to follow specific guidelines, said Bob Goldin, director of the food supplier practice at consulting firm Technomic Inc.

"I don't think consumers will dig that deep. I think they'll just say 'Oops, there's something bad in rice,'" Goldin said.

Earlier this year, Consumer Reports called for limits on arsenic in apple and grape juices after similar testing found "worrisome" levels in those childhood staples.

Food manufacturers and groups representing the $34 billion rice industry said singling out rice products was alarmist.

"Recent media stories based on studies about high levels of arsenic in rice are misleading the public about this issue, given that arsenic is everywhere and present in air, soil, water, and foods, including fruits and vegetables," the USA Rice Federation said on its website.

Nestle Nutrition said in a statement that its Gerber baby products, including its rice cereals, are safe to consume. It added that it began exclusive use of California rice for all of its rice-containing dry infant cereal earlier this year. California has the lowest arsenic levels for rice grown in the United States, the company said.

A spokeswoman for General Mills Inc, whose Rice Chex cereal was included in the Consumer Reports study, said the company was confident there should be no concern for consumers eating their product.

Two Rice Krispies products tested by Consumer Reports had arsenic levels below the publication's recommended limits, but Kellogg Co will work with the FDA, scientists and others in the industry to review the data, said spokeswoman Kris Charles.

Officials at other food manufacturers and retailers, including PepsiCo Inc's Quaker Oats were not immediately available for comment.

LINKS TO DISEASE

Inorganic arsenic is deadly at high doses. It has been linked to a variety of cancers, including skin, lung and bladder, as well as heart disease and other illnesses.

Organic arsenic is believed to be far less harmful, but two organic forms measured - called DMA and MMA - are classified as possible carcinogens, Consumer Reports said.

Food is a major source of arsenic in the American diet, as the chemical is still used in feed for poultry and occasionally hogs to prevent disease. Waste from those animals can contaminate fields when it is used as fertilizer.

As a result, arsenic can be found in fruits, vegetables, rice and seafood - all of which are considered healthy. The U.S. government has a federal limit for arsenic in drinking water at 10 parts per billion (ppb).

"There is no such thing as a safe level of arsenic," said Michael Harbut, a researcher and physician who leads the Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute's Environmental Cancer Program at Wayne State University in Detroit and treats people with arsenic poisoning.

"Consumers should demand that the FDA do a better job of patrolling inorganic arsenic in the food supply," said Caroline Smith DeWaal, food safety director for the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a nonprofit.

She added that the public would be well served with limits that consider exposure to inorganic arsenic in water as well as a variety of foods.

White rice grown in Arkansas, Louisiana, Missouri and Texas, which account for 34 percent of U.S. produced rice, generally had higher levels of total arsenic and inorganic arsenic than rice samples from elsewhere, including India and Thailand, Consumer Reports said.

The group's rice tests included multiple samples of more than 60 products - including white and brown rice, infant rice cereals, rice crackers, rice pasta and rice drinks. It found measurable amounts of total arsenic - both inorganic and organic forms - in samples of almost every product tested.

The tests also showed that brown rice had higher levels of arsenic. That is because arsenic is concentrated in its healthy outer layers, which are removed to make white rice.

Products that raise particular concern for children - who are still developing and have significantly lower body weights than adults - include infant rice cereal, ready-to-eat cold breakfast cereals and rice milk, Consumer Reports said.

(Additional reporting by Caroline Humer and Jessica Wohl; Editing by Michele Gershberg, Jacqueline Wong, Andrew Hay, Andre Grenon and Bob Burgdorfer)




http://news.yahoo.co...-133936552.html

Edited by beeguy, 20 September 2012 - 09:34 PM.

03/02/2010: First trip to the Philippines.
04/06/2010: Joined WOF
04/11/2010: Met on Cherry Blossoms.
05/06/2010: Talked her into joining WOF.
05/13/2010: Changed our statuses on Facebook to "in a relationship".
05/28/2010: Met her friend and her employer in Chicago (here on business).
08/17/2010: Booked trip to the Philippines.
09/05/2010: Arrived in Manila late at night. Met her in the waiting area. WOW!
09/08/2010: Met her parents and most of the family!
09/10/2010: Trekked to the top of Mt. Pinatubo and surprised her with a ring. She said YES!
09/19/2010: Had to return to US. :(
03/25/2011: Arrived second visit with her. Together again.
04/14/2011: Flew back to Chicago :(

K-1
07/25/2011: Starting on K-1 package. Where did I put all that stuff???
08/02/2011: K-1 Petition package mailed via Priority Mail to Texas Service Center! The clock is running...

08/09/2011: K-1 Petition package delivered to Texas Service Center.
08/13/2011: K-1 Petition NOA1 received.
01/11/2012: I129F PETITION FOR FIANCE(E) APPROVED
01/27/2012: NVC notification letter received.
02/07/2012: She received the letter from the US Embassy
02/14/2012: She passed the physical at St. Lukes!
02/15/2012: She finished her CFO seminar
02/27/2012: Depart O'Hare for Manila
02/28/2012: Arrived very late in Manila

03/01/2012: Interview at the US Embassy - K1 VISA APPROVED!!
03/07/2012: Visa delivered!
03/08/2012: Got CFO sticker.

03/16/2012: Arrived in the USA together.

05/12/2012: Married!!!

AOS

05/18/2012: Mailed AOS package to USCIS.
08/10/2012: Received temp Emp Auth Card with Advanced Parole from USCIS.

04/04/2013: Received her Permanent Resident Card from USCIS!

 

Removing Conditions

03/20/2015: Mailed I-751 package to USCIS

03/23/2015: I-751 package arrived at the California Service Center

03/25/2015: I-751 check cashed by USCIS

03/27/2015: I-751 NOA received from USCIS

04/13/2015: Bought tickets to Phil for her brother's wedding in June.

 

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#2 Roxas Ron

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 10:41 PM

U.S. needs arsenic limits in rice: Consumer Report

By Lisa Baertlein and Caroline Humer | Reuters Sept. 19, 2012

LOS ANGELES/NEW YORK (Reuters) - Consumer Reports is urging U.S. limits for arsenic in rice after tests of more than 60 popular products - from Kellogg's Rice Krispies to Gerber infant cereal - showed most contained some level of inorganic arsenic, a known human carcinogen.

The watchdog group said some varieties of brown rice - including brands sold by Whole Foods Markets Inc and Wal-Mart Stores Inc - contained particularly significant levels of inorganic arsenic.

It recommended ways for children and adults to limit their intake of rice products each week and said U.S. regulators should ban arsenic-containing drugs and pesticides used in crop and animal production.

For the full report, see: http://www.consumerr...arsenic1112.htm

"The goal of our report is to inform — not alarm — consumers about the importance of reducing arsenic exposure," said Urvashi Rangan, director of safety and sustainability at Consumer Reports. "The silver lining in all of this is that it is possible to get a better handle on this."

In the absence of government regulation, steps that consumers can take include limiting infant rice cereal to one serving per day for babies and excluding rice milk from the daily diets of children under the age of 5, the report said. Adults should eat no more than two servings of rice per week.

As replacements, it suggested other healthy whole grains such as wheat, corn and oats, which have lower arsenic levels.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Wednesday that it plans to collect data on 1,200 food samples by the end of the year and make its own recommendation on arsenic intake.

The agency said its preliminary data on arsenic in rice products is consistent with the Consumer Reports investigation. It found average levels of inorganic arsenic for various rice products of 3.5 to 6.7 micrograms per serving in about 200 samples. Consumer Reports notes that the most stringent U.S. state restriction on inorganic arsenic in drinking water sets a permissible limit of 5 micrograms in a single liter.

"Our advice right now is that consumers should continue to eat a balanced diet that includes a wide variety of grains - not only for good nutrition, but also to minimize any potential consequences from consuming any one particular food," FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg said in a statement.

Consumers are likely to cut back on rice altogether rather than try to follow specific guidelines, said Bob Goldin, director of the food supplier practice at consulting firm Technomic Inc.

"I don't think consumers will dig that deep. I think they'll just say 'Oops, there's something bad in rice,'" Goldin said.

Earlier this year, Consumer Reports called for limits on arsenic in apple and grape juices after similar testing found "worrisome" levels in those childhood staples.

Food manufacturers and groups representing the $34 billion rice industry said singling out rice products was alarmist.

"Recent media stories based on studies about high levels of arsenic in rice are misleading the public about this issue, given that arsenic is everywhere and present in air, soil, water, and foods, including fruits and vegetables," the USA Rice Federation said on its website.

Nestle Nutrition said in a statement that its Gerber baby products, including its rice cereals, are safe to consume. It added that it began exclusive use of California rice for all of its rice-containing dry infant cereal earlier this year. California has the lowest arsenic levels for rice grown in the United States, the company said.

A spokeswoman for General Mills Inc, whose Rice Chex cereal was included in the Consumer Reports study, said the company was confident there should be no concern for consumers eating their product.

Two Rice Krispies products tested by Consumer Reports had arsenic levels below the publication's recommended limits, but Kellogg Co will work with the FDA, scientists and others in the industry to review the data, said spokeswoman Kris Charles.

Officials at other food manufacturers and retailers, including PepsiCo Inc's Quaker Oats were not immediately available for comment.

LINKS TO DISEASE

Inorganic arsenic is deadly at high doses. It has been linked to a variety of cancers, including skin, lung and bladder, as well as heart disease and other illnesses.

Organic arsenic is believed to be far less harmful, but two organic forms measured - called DMA and MMA - are classified as possible carcinogens, Consumer Reports said.

Food is a major source of arsenic in the American diet, as the chemical is still used in feed for poultry and occasionally hogs to prevent disease. Waste from those animals can contaminate fields when it is used as fertilizer.

As a result, arsenic can be found in fruits, vegetables, rice and seafood - all of which are considered healthy. The U.S. government has a federal limit for arsenic in drinking water at 10 parts per billion (ppb).

"There is no such thing as a safe level of arsenic," said Michael Harbut, a researcher and physician who leads the Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute's Environmental Cancer Program at Wayne State University in Detroit and treats people with arsenic poisoning.

"Consumers should demand that the FDA do a better job of patrolling inorganic arsenic in the food supply," said Caroline Smith DeWaal, food safety director for the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a nonprofit.

She added that the public would be well served with limits that consider exposure to inorganic arsenic in water as well as a variety of foods.

White rice grown in Arkansas, Louisiana, Missouri and Texas, which account for 34 percent of U.S. produced rice, generally had higher levels of total arsenic and inorganic arsenic than rice samples from elsewhere, including India and Thailand, Consumer Reports said.

The group's rice tests included multiple samples of more than 60 products - including white and brown rice, infant rice cereals, rice crackers, rice pasta and rice drinks. It found measurable amounts of total arsenic - both inorganic and organic forms - in samples of almost every product tested.

The tests also showed that brown rice had higher levels of arsenic. That is because arsenic is concentrated in its healthy outer layers, which are removed to make white rice.

Products that raise particular concern for children - who are still developing and have significantly lower body weights than adults - include infant rice cereal, ready-to-eat cold breakfast cereals and rice milk, Consumer Reports said.

(Additional reporting by Caroline Humer and Jessica Wohl; Editing by Michele Gershberg, Jacqueline Wong, Andrew Hay, Andre Grenon and Bob Burgdorfer)




http://news.yahoo.co...-133936552.html



wondering if anyone has researched rice grown in the RP?

#3 SeeSea

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 10:57 PM

People are moving away from corn and wheat based grains because of the health trends.. and I known those industries of wheat and corn which are based in the USA are worried about that.. the cereal industry is down. I know I sound like a conspiracy theorist but it could be they want to scare people away from grains like rice to keep the industry in the USA afloat. Just a thought. Maybe better the 100 mile diet.


#4 Thetimewillcome

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 10:58 PM

A lot of the heavy metals come from the fertilizers, especially from china. Besides arsenic, cadmium levels in rice can be high...high enough that if it were a consumer product instead of food, it might not pass ROHS requirements for importation into The EU.

October 2010- Met online
October 28, 2010-Officially a couple
Feb 26, 2011- Met at NAIA
Feb 28, 2011- Proposed in Bali
Sept 1, 2011- Second trip to the Philippines
Feb 11, 2012- Third trip to the Philippines
July 9, 2012- Final divorce judgement
Aug 10, 2012- Sent I-129F
Aug 14 2012- NOA 1

April 19 2013-NOA 2
Aug 5 Sputum negative, finished medical

Aug 7 Embassy interview passed

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#5 beeguy

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Posted 20 September 2012 - 11:48 PM

A lot of the heavy metals come from the fertilizers, especially from china. Besides arsenic, cadmium levels in rice can be high...high enough that if it were a consumer product instead of food, it might not pass ROHS requirements for importation into The EU.


I previously read somewhere (sorry I can't quote it at the moment) that the high arsenic levels in Southern US grown rice is from older insecticides used on cotton previously grown on those fields. California rice is supposed to be far lower in arsenic because cotton was not a big crop in the past. Newer insecticides don't use inorganic arsenic and most are broken down over time by soil microbes. Inorganic arsenic stays in the soil and accumulated over time. there is no easy way to remove it from soil that I am aware of.

-Keith

03/02/2010: First trip to the Philippines.
04/06/2010: Joined WOF
04/11/2010: Met on Cherry Blossoms.
05/06/2010: Talked her into joining WOF.
05/13/2010: Changed our statuses on Facebook to "in a relationship".
05/28/2010: Met her friend and her employer in Chicago (here on business).
08/17/2010: Booked trip to the Philippines.
09/05/2010: Arrived in Manila late at night. Met her in the waiting area. WOW!
09/08/2010: Met her parents and most of the family!
09/10/2010: Trekked to the top of Mt. Pinatubo and surprised her with a ring. She said YES!
09/19/2010: Had to return to US. :(
03/25/2011: Arrived second visit with her. Together again.
04/14/2011: Flew back to Chicago :(

K-1
07/25/2011: Starting on K-1 package. Where did I put all that stuff???
08/02/2011: K-1 Petition package mailed via Priority Mail to Texas Service Center! The clock is running...

08/09/2011: K-1 Petition package delivered to Texas Service Center.
08/13/2011: K-1 Petition NOA1 received.
01/11/2012: I129F PETITION FOR FIANCE(E) APPROVED
01/27/2012: NVC notification letter received.
02/07/2012: She received the letter from the US Embassy
02/14/2012: She passed the physical at St. Lukes!
02/15/2012: She finished her CFO seminar
02/27/2012: Depart O'Hare for Manila
02/28/2012: Arrived very late in Manila

03/01/2012: Interview at the US Embassy - K1 VISA APPROVED!!
03/07/2012: Visa delivered!
03/08/2012: Got CFO sticker.

03/16/2012: Arrived in the USA together.

05/12/2012: Married!!!

AOS

05/18/2012: Mailed AOS package to USCIS.
08/10/2012: Received temp Emp Auth Card with Advanced Parole from USCIS.

04/04/2013: Received her Permanent Resident Card from USCIS!

 

Removing Conditions

03/20/2015: Mailed I-751 package to USCIS

03/23/2015: I-751 package arrived at the California Service Center

03/25/2015: I-751 check cashed by USCIS

03/27/2015: I-751 NOA received from USCIS

04/13/2015: Bought tickets to Phil for her brother's wedding in June.

 

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#6 MrkGrismer

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 12:52 PM

http://www.fda.gov/F...s/ucm319948.htm

Questions & Answers: FDA’s Analysis of Arsenic in Rice and Rice Products

Back to the Arsenic in Rice Main Page

What is Arsenic?
Arsenic is a chemical element present in the environment from both natural and human sources, including erosion of arsenic-containing rocks, volcanic eruptions, contamination from mining and smelting ores, and previous or current use of arsenic-containing pesticides.

What is the FDA recommending to consumers about eating rice and rice products?

Based on the available data and scientific literature the FDA is not recommending changes by consumers regarding their consumption of rice and rice products. Our advice for consumers is to eat a balanced diet including a wide variety of grains, not only for good nutrition but also to minimize any potential consequences from consuming any one particular food.

Is rice safe to eat? Is it safe for children to eat?

Rice is an important and nutritious staple for many people. We believe it would be premature for the FDA to recommend modifying your or your child’s diet because of concerns about arsenic levels.

In looking at the research, there is an absence of the necessary scientific data that shows a causal relationship between those who consume higher levels of rice and rice products and the type of illnesses usually associated with arsenic. However, we are continuing to study this and note that other potential factors, such as other food in peoples’ diets.

What about rice cereals eaten by infants and young children?

Infant rice cereal has been used for many years because it is gluten-free, less allergenic, more easily digested, and is a good source of iron and other vitamins. With the limited data available, we are not aware of any acute health risks linked with the consumption of infant rice in the U.S.

Should I be concerned about feeding rice beverages to my children?

As with other types of rice products, we believe it would be premature for the FDA to recommend modifying your or your child’s diet because of concerns about arsenic levels. However, we note that rice-based beverages are an inadequate substitute for cow’s milk or infant formula. For example, although close in caloric content with 2% cow’s milk, they contain fewer important macronutrients such as protein, carbohydrates, and fat.

Does the FDA agree with the findings and recommendations published by Consumer Reports?

Based on a preliminary review of FDA’s testing of approximately 200 initial samples of rice and rice products, we find that the results from Consumer Reports appear to be consistent with those we are reporting based on our initial testing.

While the levels reported are consistent with those released from Consumer Reports, FDA is continuing to collect and analyze 1,000 more samples in order to adequately cover the wide variety of rice types, geographical regions where rice is grown, and the extraordinary range of foods that contain rice as an ingredient.

This will help the FDA to better understand the exposure to arsenic in rice, conduct a risk analysis, and consider steps to reduce long-term exposure. We note that there are many different types of rice and rice products from different parts of the world. They are grown very differently, and the conditions under which they are grown may vary the levels of arsenic from year to year, lot by lot.

Does the FDA agree with Consumer Reports recommendations to set limits for arsenic in rice products; and ban the feeding of arsenic-containing drugs to animals that are used for the purpose of pigmentation, growth promotion, feed efficiency and disease prevention?

The primary concern of the FDA is the safety and security of our food supply and getting the best possible scientific information to allow consumers to make informed choices. The FDA is working with other agencies to evaluate the full range of measures that may be appropriate for the FDA and other agencies in the federal government to take to limit public exposure to arsenic.

Why are Consumer Report’s recommendations on limiting rice consumption different from FDA’s advice for consumers?

Based on the available data and scientific literature the FDA is not recommending changes by consumers regarding their consumption of rice and rice products.

We believe it would be premature for the FDA to recommend modifying diets because of arsenic levels until a more thorough analysis is completed. With that said, it is important for consumers to continue eating a balanced diet including a wide variety of grains, not only for good nutrition but also to minimize any potential consequences from consuming any one particular food.

Are there different types of arsenic?

There are two types of arsenic compounds in water, food, air, and soil: organic and inorganic (these together are referred to as “total arsenic”). The inorganic forms of arsenic are the forms that have been associated with long term health effects. Because both forms of arsenic have been found in soil and ground water for many years, some arsenic may be found in certain food and beverage products, including rice, fruit juices and juice concentrates.

How does arsenic get into foods? Do all foods have arsenic?

Arsenic may be present in many foods including grains, fruits, and vegetables where it is present due to absorption through the soil and water. While most crops don’t readily take up much arsenic from the ground, rice is different because it takes up arsenic from soil and water more readily than other grains. In addition, some seafood has high levels of less toxic organic arsenic.

Do organic foods have less arsenic than non-organic foods?

The FDA is unaware of any data that shows a difference in the amount of arsenic found in organic rice vs. non-organic rice. Because arsenic is naturally found in the soil and water, it is absorbed by plants regardless of whether they are grown under conventional or organic farming practices.

What are the health risks associated with arsenic exposure?

Long-term exposure to high levels of arsenic is associated with higher rates of skin, bladder, and lung cancers, as well as heart disease. The FDA is currently examining these and other long-term effects. In looking at the research, there is an absence of the necessary scientific data that shows a causal relationship between those who consume higher levels of rice and rice products and the type of illnesses usually associated with arsenic. However, we are continuing to study this and note that other factors may be responsible.

Does the FDA test for arsenic in foods?

Yes, the FDA has been testing for total arsenic in a variety of foods, including rice and juices, through its Total Diet Study program since 1991. The agency also monitors toxic elements, including arsenic, in selected domestic and imported foods under the Toxic Elements Program, including those that children are likely to eat or drink, such as juices.

What has the FDA done about arsenic in rice?

The FDA has increased its testing of rice and rice products to determine the level and types of arsenic found in these products as part of the comprehensive, science-based and risk-based approach the agency takes to minimize risks in the food supply from contaminants.

To help consumers understand arsenic levels in rice, FDA is releasing its first set of results based on analysis of nearly 200 rice products. This is part of a larger, on-going study and analysis of more than 1,000 samples of rice products. When the FDA has finished its analysis of more than 1,000 rice products, the agency will issue additional data and update our recommendations as necessary.

We are also working with USDA, EPA, CDC and the WHO as well as industry, scientists, and all others who can help us further study the issue, assess the risks, and find ways to reduce these levels.

We have met with industry, rice companies, including organic rice companies, and consumer groups to help us better understand the production, manufacturing, and sourcing or rice and other information relative to arsenic in rice and rice products.

The FDA will continue to work on this issue as part of our role in ensuring the safety of the food supply, and we will continue to keep the public informed of what we are finding and doing.

What are “rice products”?

Rice products are foods other than rice that contain rice and rice-derived ingredients, such as brown rice syrup. In the initial 193 samples collected by the FDA, scientists tested breakfast cereals, infant cereals, rice cakes, and rice beverages.

What do the FDA’s preliminary data on rice and rice products show?

The FDA’s analysis of the initial samples found average levels of inorganic arsenic for the various rice and rice products of 3.5 to 6.7 micrograms of inorganic arsenic per serving. This is part of a larger, on-going study and analysis of 1,000 rice products.

Based on recent data from surveys conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, on average, people eat the equivalent of about 2 cups of cooked rice a week.

The preliminary data do not tell us what health effect, if any, these levels may have, nor do they tell us what can be done to reduce these levels. The data collection and analysis is a critical, but first, step to assessing risk and minimizing risk.

The FDA will be in a position to make a thorough assessment once the broader range of product testing is completed. We take seriously our responsibility to monitor and minimize risks from chemical contaminants, including arsenic.

What additional steps is FDA taking about arsenic in rice?

The FDA is collecting and testing an additional 1,000 rice and rice product samples in order to have a more thorough representation of the different types of rice grown both in the U.S. and overseas, and the wide variety of products that contain rice or rice products as an ingredient. We are testing both domestic and imported rice varieties, including white long grain, white medium grain, white short grain, brown, and basmati rice. Future sampling will also include rice crackers, rice water, infant formula, crispy rice marshmallow treats, rice wine, and breakfast and granola bars.

The FDA will be in a position to make a thorough assessment once the broader range of product testing is completed. We take seriously our responsibility to monitor and minimize risks from chemical contaminants, including arsenic.

Will FDA set limits for arsenic in rice and rice products?

We understand that consumers are concerned about arsenic being in rice and have been working hard to complete our data collection and analysis in order to better inform consumers. This is a priority for the FDA. We are sharing our initial data with consumers now but are working on a robust data collection of more than 1,000 samples that will be completed by the end of the year. Our follow up risk assessment will give us a solid scientific basis for determining what limits and other steps are needed to reduce exposure to arsenic in rice and rice products.
The FDA is working closely with other agencies to evaluate the full range of measures that may be appropriate for the FDA and other agencies in the federal government to take to limit public exposure to arsenic.

When will FDA be done with its study?

The FDA is aiming to complete the additional collection and analysis of samples in the next several months, by the end of 2012. After that is complete, the FDA will conduct a full risk assessment and update recommendations as necessary.


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http://www.uscis.gov...0004718190aRCRD
 

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#7 MrkGrismer

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 01:01 PM

Specific to the Philippines:

http://home.doh.gov....mc2006-0007.pdf

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http://www.uscis.gov...0004718190aRCRD
 

Medical Exams – A caller explained that the civil surgeon who completed the medical exam used the wrong form and then wanted to charge an indigent refugee to reprocess the paperwork on the correct form. What recourse does an applicant have if this occurs?

USCIS Response: Customers should notify the Director of their local office when they have a complaint about a civil surgeon.


#8 beeguy

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Posted 21 September 2012 - 04:17 PM

I previously read somewhere (sorry I can't quote it at the moment) that the high arsenic levels in Southern US grown rice is from older insecticides used on cotton previously grown on those fields. California rice is supposed to be far lower in arsenic because cotton was not a big crop in the past. Newer insecticides don't use inorganic arsenic and most are broken down over time by soil microbes. Inorganic arsenic stays in the soil and accumulated over time. there is no easy way to remove it from soil that I am aware of.

-Keith


Here is an article that references the cotton connection...

Food Safety: U.S. Rice Serves Up Arsenic

03/02/2010: First trip to the Philippines.
04/06/2010: Joined WOF
04/11/2010: Met on Cherry Blossoms.
05/06/2010: Talked her into joining WOF.
05/13/2010: Changed our statuses on Facebook to "in a relationship".
05/28/2010: Met her friend and her employer in Chicago (here on business).
08/17/2010: Booked trip to the Philippines.
09/05/2010: Arrived in Manila late at night. Met her in the waiting area. WOW!
09/08/2010: Met her parents and most of the family!
09/10/2010: Trekked to the top of Mt. Pinatubo and surprised her with a ring. She said YES!
09/19/2010: Had to return to US. :(
03/25/2011: Arrived second visit with her. Together again.
04/14/2011: Flew back to Chicago :(

K-1
07/25/2011: Starting on K-1 package. Where did I put all that stuff???
08/02/2011: K-1 Petition package mailed via Priority Mail to Texas Service Center! The clock is running...

08/09/2011: K-1 Petition package delivered to Texas Service Center.
08/13/2011: K-1 Petition NOA1 received.
01/11/2012: I129F PETITION FOR FIANCE(E) APPROVED
01/27/2012: NVC notification letter received.
02/07/2012: She received the letter from the US Embassy
02/14/2012: She passed the physical at St. Lukes!
02/15/2012: She finished her CFO seminar
02/27/2012: Depart O'Hare for Manila
02/28/2012: Arrived very late in Manila

03/01/2012: Interview at the US Embassy - K1 VISA APPROVED!!
03/07/2012: Visa delivered!
03/08/2012: Got CFO sticker.

03/16/2012: Arrived in the USA together.

05/12/2012: Married!!!

AOS

05/18/2012: Mailed AOS package to USCIS.
08/10/2012: Received temp Emp Auth Card with Advanced Parole from USCIS.

04/04/2013: Received her Permanent Resident Card from USCIS!

 

Removing Conditions

03/20/2015: Mailed I-751 package to USCIS

03/23/2015: I-751 package arrived at the California Service Center

03/25/2015: I-751 check cashed by USCIS

03/27/2015: I-751 NOA received from USCIS

04/13/2015: Bought tickets to Phil for her brother's wedding in June.

 

IMG_0692.JPG


#9 beeguy

beeguy
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Posted 21 September 2012 - 05:33 PM

Here is an article that references the cotton connection...

Food Safety: U.S. Rice Serves Up Arsenic


This is the original Consumer Reports article with charts. Rice from India, Thailand, and California were lowest for inorganic arsenic.


Arsenic in your food

03/02/2010: First trip to the Philippines.
04/06/2010: Joined WOF
04/11/2010: Met on Cherry Blossoms.
05/06/2010: Talked her into joining WOF.
05/13/2010: Changed our statuses on Facebook to "in a relationship".
05/28/2010: Met her friend and her employer in Chicago (here on business).
08/17/2010: Booked trip to the Philippines.
09/05/2010: Arrived in Manila late at night. Met her in the waiting area. WOW!
09/08/2010: Met her parents and most of the family!
09/10/2010: Trekked to the top of Mt. Pinatubo and surprised her with a ring. She said YES!
09/19/2010: Had to return to US. :(
03/25/2011: Arrived second visit with her. Together again.
04/14/2011: Flew back to Chicago :(

K-1
07/25/2011: Starting on K-1 package. Where did I put all that stuff???
08/02/2011: K-1 Petition package mailed via Priority Mail to Texas Service Center! The clock is running...

08/09/2011: K-1 Petition package delivered to Texas Service Center.
08/13/2011: K-1 Petition NOA1 received.
01/11/2012: I129F PETITION FOR FIANCE(E) APPROVED
01/27/2012: NVC notification letter received.
02/07/2012: She received the letter from the US Embassy
02/14/2012: She passed the physical at St. Lukes!
02/15/2012: She finished her CFO seminar
02/27/2012: Depart O'Hare for Manila
02/28/2012: Arrived very late in Manila

03/01/2012: Interview at the US Embassy - K1 VISA APPROVED!!
03/07/2012: Visa delivered!
03/08/2012: Got CFO sticker.

03/16/2012: Arrived in the USA together.

05/12/2012: Married!!!

AOS

05/18/2012: Mailed AOS package to USCIS.
08/10/2012: Received temp Emp Auth Card with Advanced Parole from USCIS.

04/04/2013: Received her Permanent Resident Card from USCIS!

 

Removing Conditions

03/20/2015: Mailed I-751 package to USCIS

03/23/2015: I-751 package arrived at the California Service Center

03/25/2015: I-751 check cashed by USCIS

03/27/2015: I-751 NOA received from USCIS

04/13/2015: Bought tickets to Phil for her brother's wedding in June.

 

IMG_0692.JPG


#10 Psoas10

Psoas10
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Posted 21 September 2012 - 08:16 PM

Well we eat a lot of rice here in Hawaii. Nobody seem to have any problems here. But calrose brand is the most popular here.




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