Jump to content


Photo

Lack of planning a proper budget


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 1PPCLI

1PPCLI
  • Senior Member
  • 420 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Calgary, AB
  • Interests:PSK-31, 80M DX
  • Visa type:Naturalization, None
  • em

Posted 25 January 2014 - 09:30 PM

Folks:

 

The year is not even a month old, and I have been approached three times already for loans, ranging for $2000 - $5000. All of the loans are for 'show money' to prove to the government/landlords/etc access to funds. 

 

Now, I am not resistant in helping people, when they are need, but I have to wonder, where money is spent from employment. I understand the need to help the family back home, but from anecdotical observations, a sizeable portion of the money sent home is spent on needless luxuries. I was always taught to save money for a rainy day, so would it not make sense to sent less home, and save something for tomorrow. Or am I being unreasonable? Is it necessary to support nieces/nephews by giving them the latest phone, while you have no money for yourself? 

 

I guess I am just perplexed on the thought pattern.

 

Comments?

 



#2 Cartero

Cartero
  • Senior Member
  • 1,200 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 25 January 2014 - 11:06 PM

Dollars  not pesos? Is it show money for a shabu deal?



#3 Fritz

Fritz

    Experience is what you have left after you have lost everything

  • Root Admin
  • 3,261 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spokane WA USA / Argao Cebu RP
  • Visa type:CR-1

Posted 25 January 2014 - 11:32 PM

Folks:
 
The year is not even a month old, and I have been approached three times already for loans, ranging for $2000 - $5000. All of the loans are for 'show money' to prove to the government/landlords/etc access to funds. 
 
Now, I am not resistant in helping people, when they are need, but I have to wonder, where money is spent from employment. I understand the need to help the family back home, but from anecdotical observations, a sizeable portion of the money sent home is spent on needless luxuries. I was always taught to save money for a rainy day, so would it not make sense to sent less home, and save something for tomorrow. Or am I being unreasonable? Is it necessary to support nieces/nephews by giving them the latest phone, while you have no money for yourself? 
 
I guess I am just perplexed on the thought pattern.
 
Comments?

It's a difference in cultural expectations. The Western culture of North America and Europe encourages people to be independent and do for themselves, so emergencies are expected to be paid for from savings set aside for the purpose. Westerners tend to buy big ticket items the same way, save until most of the money is available, then buy.

In Philippines and large parts of SE Asia and Pacifica, the community is expected to help when things go wrong. So instead of putting money in savings to be used for future need you spend it today for things you want or to help friends and family with their financial emergencies. The social network replaces the savings account.

Needless to say the independent Payday Loan providers (it is often the neighbor who saves their money and loans it out to anyone in the neighborhood who is short that week) and pawnshops are big money makers as people turn to these quick loan outlets whenever they need to dip into "savings".

This is often a source of trouble between the Kano and the Filipino relatives as the Kanos ask "Why do they need to ask for help?" and the Filipinos ask "Why aren't they willing to help when asked?" :P

Both cultures view installments the same way though ... take it home today and pay extra for the privilege of dribbling the payment out over many months after the purchase. This can lead to major budget problems as the buyer "discovers" afterward that the bill for the payment keeps coming back to take a bite out of their income for months or even years after the purchase.

@Cartero When Yanks are asked for money, they tend to hear $USD amounts because that is what the bank account holds. Even when the request is for pesos, euros, pounds etc., the Yank thinks in the dollar equivalents that are everyday usage.

The adventure continues
Fritz

May you find what you want in life,
know it when you see it and
have the good luck to get it
... and keep it!!!


#4 MrkGrismer

MrkGrismer
  • Moderators
  • 12,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Auburn Hills, MI
  • Visa type:Naturalization, None
  • lo

Posted 27 January 2014 - 04:19 PM

From what I can tell in Filipino culture if you have extra there is a pressure to send it to help others in the family. It seems that this would make it difficult to save.

I'm not sure about Canadian visa proces, but 'show money' for a U.S. visa is counter-productive.

If you believe Modern Sporting Rifles have a legitimate use, please like, share and participate on: https://www.facebook...tamateSportsmen

http://www.uscis.gov...0004718190aRCRD
 

Medical Exams – A caller explained that the civil surgeon who completed the medical exam used the wrong form and then wanted to charge an indigent refugee to reprocess the paperwork on the correct form. What recourse does an applicant have if this occurs?

USCIS Response: Customers should notify the Director of their local office when they have a complaint about a civil surgeon.


#5 1PPCLI

1PPCLI
  • Senior Member
  • 420 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Calgary, AB
  • Interests:PSK-31, 80M DX
  • Visa type:Naturalization, None
  • em

Posted 28 January 2014 - 05:15 PM

Sorry in the delay, but been busy with some other things. 

 

Have no idea what the money is being used for, though I suspect some of it is being used for consultant fees for the paperwork, then to show a balance in an account for immigration purposes. 

 

What I am getting at, is there is an unfair expectation of the support of the family. I think, we all know OFW's living stacked like firewood, doing long hours, and sacrificing some little luxuries and pampering, just so money can be sent home. While I understand the ties of family, and obligation, one should also be able to enjoy life, too. I just think family back in the Philippines have an unfair expectation of support and the ease of making money. I have nieces/nephews who change cell phones whenever the newest one come out, while I can make do with 6 year old piece of kit, since it is a phone and it makes calls is all I worry about. They don't work, live as if they own houses in Forbes Park, as their uncles/aunts send money to help them. 

 

In these specific cases, all the parties knew the day was coming where they would need this cash, yet they didn't budget for it. The minimum period of time was 3 years, though the average time period is higher, and the amount could of been saved over that period. Maybe I am being unrealistic but I do think they should be planning ahead. 

 

I do ascribe to the motto, everyone needs a hand, and if you can afford to, you help. But when I see the same show being repeated, it just gets frustrating. 



#6 Fritz

Fritz

    Experience is what you have left after you have lost everything

  • Root Admin
  • 3,261 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Spokane WA USA / Argao Cebu RP
  • Visa type:CR-1

Posted 28 January 2014 - 10:39 PM

They did budget for it ... they kept the "rich" relatives buttered up so they would be willing to pay when the day came :P

It is a difference in cultures. Many relatives who have emigrated become westernized and feel the way you do. I work with a gal who left Cebu 45 years ago ... she has never been back due to fear of relatives asking for money in person ... she is after all a "rich American", but she remembers too well what the culture she grew up in is like.

The adventure continues
Fritz

May you find what you want in life,
know it when you see it and
have the good luck to get it
... and keep it!!!


#7 MrkGrismer

MrkGrismer
  • Moderators
  • 12,855 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Auburn Hills, MI
  • Visa type:Naturalization, None
  • lo

Posted 29 January 2014 - 06:45 PM

There does seem to be a lack of planning, perhaps the expectation is that since they help out their relatives when it is needed, they will receive the same help when they need it. The only thing is, with Filipinos that leave the Philippines that road seems to end up being pretty 'one-way'. It isn't all on those in the Philippines either. Filipinas overseas WANT to 'do good' by their families and seem to be willing to put themselves in distress to do so, even if it means going deeply into debt.

If you believe Modern Sporting Rifles have a legitimate use, please like, share and participate on: https://www.facebook...tamateSportsmen

http://www.uscis.gov...0004718190aRCRD
 

Medical Exams – A caller explained that the civil surgeon who completed the medical exam used the wrong form and then wanted to charge an indigent refugee to reprocess the paperwork on the correct form. What recourse does an applicant have if this occurs?

USCIS Response: Customers should notify the Director of their local office when they have a complaint about a civil surgeon.


#8 Smitty91

Smitty91
  • Senior Member
  • 1,131 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Home is where the heart is and my heart is with my wife.
  • Visa type:Naturalization, None
  • ca
  • Local Office:Denver

Posted 14 February 2014 - 07:36 PM

When my wife moved to the US we talked about the family's expectations in terms of sending money. I told her that we needed to make sure we are "OK" before we can help them out. We are blessed that the family hasn't really asked for anything. It's more of us wanting to help them out.  So we regularly (every other month or so) send money to the family. It's not alot but does help them out. We'll try to send a little more over the holidays as well.  My wife was recently approached by a family member who needed help paying for medical bills. We were able to send some, not all, of the amount requested.

 

Whatever you decide upon in terms of sending cash, be sure to consider it a gift to them and not a loan. Otherwise you'll be miserable.


Love is a decision... an act of will. ~Fr John Corapi.
The Will of God will never take you to a place where the Grace of God does not protect you. ~unkown
Posted Image + Posted Image = Posted Image
Timelines
Facebook Page

#9 1PPCLI

1PPCLI
  • Senior Member
  • 420 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Calgary, AB
  • Interests:PSK-31, 80M DX
  • Visa type:Naturalization, None
  • em

Posted 17 February 2014 - 04:35 PM

Any money I have loaned, always considered it a gift. If I can't afford to write it off, then I don't give it. 

 

Been very fortunate, like you, that we do not get asked for money, we give at our discretion. What irks me in these particular cases, is the imposition. They knew this day was coming for years, so why not prepare for it over the years. Maybe it is because I have always been a saver, scarificing comfort and luxury items, so as to put money away for a rainy day. Now it is, we need money, so paperwork can be filed or we will have to go home. So the years spent here, trying to become residents will be wasted. 

 

We resolved the issue BTW, so as the saying goes, why cry over spilt milk.



#10 Ako Ay Pilipino

Ako Ay Pilipino
  • Members
  • 48 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Northern Central Region of Luzon. Formerly from Northern & Southern California
  • Visa type:Naturalization, None

Posted 17 February 2014 - 05:10 PM

I resolved that same issue too! When we moved to the Philippines to retire, the "Gravy Train" stopped dead in it's tracks too! 


"Life is what we all make it to be!" 

"It's always a matter of money!"

"Do on to others as they would do on to you, but do it first!"

"QUE SERA SERA!"





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users