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Dual Citizen & Traveling PI


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#1 angelnoah

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 10:07 PM

Hi all,

I am a dual citizen, and traveling to the Philippines this November and will be staying there for 2 1/2 months. To my knowledge, I don't need to apply for the visa extension for being a US citizen, and I can stay there as I want, am I right?

When I come back to the US, do I need to present my Philippine passport at the immigration? I normally carry my 2 passports going to and back but my previous stays in the Philippines were only 2 weeks. So, the normal thing that I did during those previous stays was that I showed both my passports when arriving and going out Philippines and only present my US passport coming back to the US.

Just wanted to be sure, so I am asking the questions. Thanks :)

#2 Mr. Lee

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Posted 24 September 2012 - 10:40 PM

Hi all,

I am a dual citizen, and traveling to the Philippines this November and will be staying there for 2 1/2 months. To my knowledge, I don't need to apply for the visa extension for being a US citizen, and I can stay there as I want, am I right?

When I come back to the US, do I need to present my Philippine passport at the immigration? I normally carry my 2 passports going to and back but my previous stays in the Philippines were only 2 weeks. So, the normal thing that I did during those previous stays was that I showed both my passports when arriving and going out Philippines and only present my US passport coming back to the US.

Just wanted to be sure, so I am asking the questions. Thanks :)


To keep it simple for just a trip to the Philippines all you need is your US passport. If you were to want to buy land or property or open bank accounts while there, then it might be good to have your Philippine passport.

The BALIKBAYAN PROGRAM lets you stay up to a year at a time using your US passport and possibly showing your Philippine passport upon entry into the Philippines if asked to prove you were born in the Philippines but most likely they will never ask for it and if you speak the language and your US passport says born in the Philippines, then you should be all set without ever showing your Philippines passport.

As a US citizen all you need upon reentry into the US is your US passport.



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#3 Fritz

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 03:23 AM

To keep it simple for just a trip to the Philippines all you need is your US passport. If you were to want to buy land or property or open bank accounts while there, then it might be good to have your Philippine passport.

The BALIKBAYAN PROGRAM lets you stay up to a year at a time using your US passport and possibly showing your Philippine passport upon entry into the Philippines if asked to prove you were born in the Philippines but most likely they will never ask for it and if you speak the language and your US passport says born in the Philippines, then you should be all set without ever showing your Philippines passport.

As a US citizen all you need upon reentry into the US is your US passport.

To add to Mr. Lee's reply...

Use an expired Philippine passport if you have one to show prior Philippine citizenship. US and Philippines both require their citizens to use a domestic passport for entry and departure. An expired Philippine passport documents your claim to be a former Philippine citizen qualifying you, and if they are accompanying you, your spouse and children as Balikbayans who qualify for the 1 year Balikbayan Privilege visa stamp.

Using a current Philippine passport may cause questions about citizenship status, but should not otherwise be a problem when entering as a US citizen Balikbayan.

The adventure continues
Fritz

May you find what you want in life,
know it when you see it and
have the good luck to get it
... and keep it!!!


#4 angelnoah

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 03:43 AM

I have a current Philippine passport that I am using together with my US passport every time I go Philippines. I applied for the dual citizenship because I own a house in the Philippines.

Anyway thanks...I didn't know the Balikbayan program exists. Lol!

#5 MrkGrismer

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 01:00 PM

If you are a dual citizen you really should keep both passports current and with you when you travel. To make it easy on yourself just present both passports when you go thru customs in either country and let them take the one they want to put the stamp on.

The reason I feel it is important to keep both passports current is 'in case' something happens where the use of one passport or the other would be advantageous to you, when such an emergency happens it is normally 'too late' to get it renewed.

If you believe Modern Sporting Rifles have a legitimate use, please like, share and participate on: https://www.facebook...tamateSportsmen

http://www.uscis.gov...0004718190aRCRD
 

Medical Exams – A caller explained that the civil surgeon who completed the medical exam used the wrong form and then wanted to charge an indigent refugee to reprocess the paperwork on the correct form. What recourse does an applicant have if this occurs?

USCIS Response: Customers should notify the Director of their local office when they have a complaint about a civil surgeon.


#6 angelnoah

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 06:52 PM

If you are a dual citizen you really should keep both passports current and with you when you travel. To make it easy on yourself just present both passports when you go thru customs in either country and let them take the one they want to put the stamp on.

The reason I feel it is important to keep both passports current is 'in case' something happens where the use of one passport or the other would be advantageous to you, when such an emergency happens it is normally 'too late' to get it renewed.


Thanks MrkGrismer. I agree with you, and that's what I always do every time I travel to and from the Philippines. I am a frequent traveler as I go home to the Philippines at least once a year. My upcoming trip would be the longest one since it would be almost 3 months, while I regularly visit for 2 weeks in my previous trips, the reason why I got curious to ask some questions here.

By the way, I remember an immigration officer in NAIA where she asked me which passport should she put the stamp on it, when I gave both my passports...I was like, huh??? does she need to ask that? So, I said..."BOTH?" with a question mark..LOL!
Then in another trip, an immigration officer just returned back my PI passport and said he didn't need it, and that he would only need to stamp the US passport.
So, it made me think that every officer there had different way of doing it, but the golden rule is to always have the 2 passports...(at least, in my own opinion), for peace of mind :).

I have another question...how does a "balikbayan" stamp looks like? Or is there one? I haven't seen one as they only stamp my passports with the date of arrival and they put "with pp" below the date of arrival stamp. I am not aware of the "Balikbayan program" because I haven't heard any officer telling me I am benefited by it. :blink:

Anyway, it shouldn't be a big deal...as long as you look like a Filipino and speak Tagalog, that's more than enough to know you're one true Pinoy! :P

#7 MrkGrismer

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 07:58 PM

I believe the stamp looks like this:

Posted Image

Can't say for sure off hand.

If you believe Modern Sporting Rifles have a legitimate use, please like, share and participate on: https://www.facebook...tamateSportsmen

http://www.uscis.gov...0004718190aRCRD
 

Medical Exams – A caller explained that the civil surgeon who completed the medical exam used the wrong form and then wanted to charge an indigent refugee to reprocess the paperwork on the correct form. What recourse does an applicant have if this occurs?

USCIS Response: Customers should notify the Director of their local office when they have a complaint about a civil surgeon.


#8 Mr. Lee

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 08:25 PM

I do not believe they have a specific stamp for the Balikbayan since each time we have arrived they stamp the passport with an arrival stamp that has the date of arrival and write in the the airline number we arrived on, and then some write BB and yet others write 1 year and yet others have written in a date a year from the arrival date and yet others have written in a combination of both, so I guess there is no correct way or wrong way to do it as long as it is clear that the person arriving has a year to stay.

To add, my wife has never needed to show her Philippine passport even once to Philippine immigration since she became a US Citizen and I feel showing it to the US immigration might just muddy the waters. I was taught a long time ago to just supply the basic that is needed and not to add any more to confuse an issue.

Edited by Mr. Lee, 25 September 2012 - 08:33 PM.
repair typing error

Retired, happily married since 94 & live part time in Cebu City and the rest of the time in Florida, USA.


#9 angelnoah

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 09:01 PM

MrkGrismer, can't seem to see the photo :(

Mr. Lee, I believe it should be a case to case basis. In my case, I own properties in the Philippines. And I believe the stamps documenting your ins and outs of the country on the PI passport would be valuable as documenting evidences when time comes that you get to work with any property processing while in the Philippines.

On the other hand, I think there's no need to show the PI passport when entering US. It would also be nonsense doing it...not, unless there might be a problem where the US immigration officer think it doesn't look right where he may ask to see it.

I originally didn't plan to have dual citizenship in the first place since I know it would not create any problems in going in and out to and from the Philippines. The problem arose when the real estate people whom I bought the house doesn't recognize me being a US citizen to own a house, unless I get to re acquire my Fil. citizenship.
Just getting a house in the Philippines has complicated paper works too!...and it's driving me crazy! :blink:

After re acquiring my Filipino citizenship back and got my PI passport, the processing of all the legal paper works went smoothly...my Philippine passport can do such big things when it comes to land property transactions there.

#10 MrkGrismer

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Posted 25 September 2012 - 09:28 PM

Hm. The stamp is a circle stamp.

If you believe Modern Sporting Rifles have a legitimate use, please like, share and participate on: https://www.facebook...tamateSportsmen

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Medical Exams – A caller explained that the civil surgeon who completed the medical exam used the wrong form and then wanted to charge an indigent refugee to reprocess the paperwork on the correct form. What recourse does an applicant have if this occurs?

USCIS Response: Customers should notify the Director of their local office when they have a complaint about a civil surgeon.


#11 Mr. Lee

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 12:51 AM

Hm. The stamp is a circle stamp.


The arrival in the Philippines stamps in my passport and that of my wife are rectangle each and every time and they have used red or green ink, and the departure stamps are all round and again red or green ink.

Also only in 2011 and this year 2012 did the US stamp our US passports when we arrived back in the US and before that they never stamped them.



Retired, happily married since 94 & live part time in Cebu City and the rest of the time in Florida, USA.


#12 angelnoah

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 01:51 AM

The arrival in the Philippines stamps in my passport and that of my wife are rectangle each and every time and they have used red or green ink, and the departure stamps are all round and again red or green ink.

Also only in 2011 and this year 2012 did the US stamp our US passports when we arrived back in the US and before that they never stamped them.


I checked my PI passport and they have a red ink in rectangular shape for arrivals and green ink in round shape for departures! :P

The US never put stamps on my US passport at all, even my latest trip this year (March 2012). Are they conserving ink??

Posted Image

#13 Mr. Lee

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 01:06 PM

I checked my PI passport and they have a red ink in rectangular shape for arrivals and green ink in round shape for departures! :P

The US never put stamps on my US passport at all, even my latest trip this year (March 2012). Are they conserving ink??

Posted Image


Those are the same type of stamps in my passport but to the right of the little bit of writing on the Arrival rectangle ones in yours, mine has either BB, or 1 year, or a date which was one year from arrival, or BB and 1 year and I think one had BB and a date one year from arrival. Both my wife's and my passport are loaded with stamps like those since we travel to the Philippines every year and on some years had gone twice during a year, back when airfares were more reasonable or we got a deal due to mileage. I am surprised none of yours say BB but possibly they did not feel you needed them if they asked how long you were staying and therefore knew it would be below the 21 days, yet IMO they should have stamped them BB anyway in case you changed your mind and stayed longer.

Retired, happily married since 94 & live part time in Cebu City and the rest of the time in Florida, USA.


#14 angelnoah

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 02:51 PM

I didn't receive any BB stamps on both of my passports . They only put "w/ P.P." On the other hand, I checked my husband's passport, and they had the BB on one of the stamps there, and there is also 1 year indicated on one of the stamps! That was funny! They only put the BB mark on my husband's, and they put "w/ P.P." on mine. Oh well, I think the officers are assuming that I already know I can stay as long as I want with the "P.P." thingy... :P

Anyway, am thanking the forum, if I didn't ask, I shouldn't have known about the BB program. All those trips that we've been doing with my husband, what he knows is that he is only allowed 3 weeks stay and that he has to apply for extension after that. Gosh, I should have known that and explained to him...both of us never knew anything about that!

On the other hand, it was a good thing that he only can stay a maximum of 3 weeks due to work. But he soon would be retiring and wants to stay longer in the Philippines, so this would be a good news for him...altho it's an old news I discovered! :D

Thanks Mr. Lee for the inputs. It led me to check on my husband's passport stamps, and I found the "BB" there..lol!
Thanks for WOF, once again. Everytime I get to post here, I always learn information that are valuable.

Til next posting. How I wish I should be coming here more often. I'm having time constraints, but I will try, hehehehe!

God bless us all! :)

#15 MrkGrismer

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Posted 26 September 2012 - 03:44 PM

I would guess "w/P.P." means "with Philippine Passport"

If you believe Modern Sporting Rifles have a legitimate use, please like, share and participate on: https://www.facebook...tamateSportsmen

http://www.uscis.gov...0004718190aRCRD
 

Medical Exams – A caller explained that the civil surgeon who completed the medical exam used the wrong form and then wanted to charge an indigent refugee to reprocess the paperwork on the correct form. What recourse does an applicant have if this occurs?

USCIS Response: Customers should notify the Director of their local office when they have a complaint about a civil surgeon.


#16 sibuyas

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Posted 18 May 2016 - 03:40 PM

I just have questions regarding Dual citizensip,                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   1.) Can the Philippine government impose a tax on me while I'm working here in the US?                                                                                                                                                                           2 )  We bought a land back home on terms for 7 years even without re-acquiring my Filipino citizenship yet, will there be a problem with that?



#17 Fritz

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Posted 19 May 2016 - 11:09 AM

1) Non-Resident Philippine citizens with only non-Philippine income do not have to file PH income tax
So as long as you are a US resident, not receiving income from a source in Philippines you will not pay PH income tax on your income
http://www.bir.gov.p...-tax.html#it002

From the Philippine Consulate in Sidney

Owning Land in the Philippines
Former natural-born Filipinos can own property in the Philippines, subject to limitations prescribed by Philippine Republic Act 8179 (residential property up to 1000 square meters of urban land or one hectare of rural land) and Batas Pambansa 185 (business property 5000 square meters of urban land or three hectares of rural land).

Philippines real estate law does not allow outright ownership of real property by foreign nationals. Filipinos and former Filipino citizens and Philippine majority owned corporations are permitted to own land, buildings, condominiums and townhouses.

Foreign nationals may buy condominiums units in Philippine condos (shares in condominium corporations) as long as not more than 40% of the units in a project are acquired by foreigners (Republic Act 4726, otherwise known as the Condominium Act).

So currently you are permitted to own 1000 sq meters in a city or town and 1 hectare in a rural area. If you reacquire citizenship then there is no limitation to property ownership.
If the land you purchased exceeds these limits, then file for reacquisition of Philippine citizenship to avoid any problems.

The adventure continues
Fritz

May you find what you want in life,
know it when you see it and
have the good luck to get it
... and keep it!!!


#18 TechnoWeenie

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Posted 07 September 2016 - 12:17 PM

The interesting thing about buying here in the PH,  My wife's PH passport is in her maiden name (need to fix that some day).  So they wanted to do the titles of the properties in that name.  Quick trip to the post office, we got a postal ID (gov issue) with the married name.  Then on the title and tax dec we had  " <wifes married name> married to <my name>.  So all of our titles have me on it.. even only as a 'side note'.  But this does allow some protection later.

 

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*12-12-03 - Met in Malaysia
*(a bunch of things)
*02-04-06 - married
*02-17-06 I-130 filed
*03-03-06 Recieved NOA1 - 130
*03-20-06 Recieved NOA1 - 129
*05-11-06 NOA2 - 130
*(a bunch of things)
*11-20-06 Finished Medical (all was ok)
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*01-10-07 Wife has visa in hand - K3
*01-29-07 Wife arrived in US on K3
*05-04-07 Intervew date - CR1 (Approved)
*05-16-07 Wife arrived in US on CR1
*05-29-07 SSN arrived in mail
*06-04-07 GC arrived in mail
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*02-26-09 I-797C NOA recieved
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*05-05-09 Notice of GC production received (no interview)
*06-03-09 Ten Year GC arrived in the mail
*01-05-12 N-400 application mailed
*02-08-12 Biometrics completed
*04-04-12 Citizen interview and Oath (passed)




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