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#1 Roxas Ron

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 10:19 PM

our son is one year old, born in america and holding a us passport. we are moving to the philippines next month.

 

our questions are:

 

1. can he fly and enter without a visa?

 

2. does the balikbayan law apply to him?

 

thank you



#2 way-to-go

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 11:34 PM

our son is one year old, born in america and holding a us passport. we are moving to the philippines next month.

 

our questions are:

 

1. can he fly and enter without a visa?

 

2. does the balikbayan law apply to him?

 

thank you

 

Yes, he can enter without a visa. So long as he is travelling with his mother (a former Philippine citizen) when he enters the Philippines.

 

Yes, it applies to him. 

 

Refer to the link: http://www.philippin...-free-stay.html





#3 Mr. Lee

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 02:58 AM

our son is one year old, born in america and holding a us passport. we are moving to the philippines next month.

 

our questions are:

 

1. can he fly and enter without a visa?

 

2. does the balikbayan law apply to him?

 

thank you

 

Make sure you have a original of your marriage license and his birth certificate showing her as his mother and you as his father, then there should be no issues and you all will then have a one year visa free stay. You can either extend it after the year or leave for a day or so and then come back and get the bb stamp again. 

 

I would suggest you get a 13a before leaving the US as it is easier and has no probation period whereas if you get it in the Philippines then there is a one year probation and possibly palms to grease, that is if it is your intent to stay in the Philippines but you can do it as above for free except for the yearly vacation trips to Hong Kong or other tourist spots. 

 

Good luck, enjoy the Philippines/ 


Retired, happily married since 94 & live part time in Cebu City and the rest of the time in Florida, USA.


#4 Roxas Ron

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 12:18 PM

 

Make sure you have a original of your marriage license and his birth certificate showing her as his mother and you as his father, then there should be no issues and you all will then have a one year visa free stay. You can either extend it after the year or leave for a day or so and then come back and get the bb stamp again. 

 

I would suggest you get a 13a before leaving the US as it is easier and has no probation period whereas if you get it in the Philippines then there is a one year probation and possibly palms to grease, that is if it is your intent to stay in the Philippines but you can do it as above for free except for the yearly vacation trips to Hong Kong or other tourist spots. 

 

Good luck, enjoy the Philippines/ 

yes i am getting my 13 a next week, of course my wife does not need one, we were just wondering about our son.

 

can he enter on the bb stamp and then just claim dual citizenship when we are there?

 

thanks



#5 Mr. Lee

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 12:51 PM

yes i am getting my 13 a next week, of course my wife does not need one, we were just wondering about our son.

 

can he enter on the bb stamp and then just claim dual citizenship when we are there?

 

thanks

Yes as far as I know and hopefully someone with more knowledge on the subject than I have will also reply, but it might be easier for you and him to do it at a local embassy in the US first. I find most things easier to accomplish in the US than in the Philippines where there is often so much red tape and the so called long nose tax often tagged on when some people see our faces. 


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#6 Roxas Ron

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 12:54 PM

Yes as far as I know and hopefully someone with more knowledge on the subject than I have will also reply, but it might be easier for you and him to do it at a local embassy in the US first. I find most things easier to accomplish in the US than in the Philippines where there is often so much red tape and the so called long nose tax often tagged on when some people see our faces. 

yes i will be getting mine at the embassy in washington d.c.

 

just wondering if it is necessary for my son to have one...or if he can get into the philippines without one



#7 Mr. Lee

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 01:44 PM

yes i will be getting mine at the embassy in washington d.c.

 

just wondering if it is necessary for my son to have one...or if he can get into the philippines without one

Yes he should be admitted as a Balikbayan under the law but if you are going to the embassy in the US anyway, why not try to get him Philippine passport at that time while still in the US. If you have read forums and see all the problems with govt red tape that is tossed at some of us, then you might wish to avoid it at all costs, if at all possible. As an example I have heard of guys made to pay bribes of many thousands of pesos for the 13a while in the Philippines and yet others who had no issues at all when it was done in the US. The Philippines tosses all types of extra charges at us every chance they get and who is to know which ones are legit and which are wrong, so I always try to deal with the embassy in the US whenever possible. If it is not possible for you to do it in the US then you should be able to do it in the Philippines but what if they want a paper that you must get from the states, then what to do. Also they will probably ask for and keep an original birth certificate for him. There should be no issues but I feel better safe than sorry. 

 

I hope someone who has done what you seek will post their experiences and how to go about it for you since I do not have children so I can only write of the experiences in relation to issues I and others I know have dealt with. 

 

For those moving to the Philippines I suggest you have many originals of all birth certificate, marriage licenses and any other official document you can think of since the Philippine govt agencies tends to keep one for each for everything you end up having to do with them. 


Edited by Mr. Lee, 09 December 2012 - 01:46 PM.

Retired, happily married since 94 & live part time in Cebu City and the rest of the time in Florida, USA.


#8 Roxas Ron

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 01:16 PM

thank you Mr Lee...

 

does anyone have insight on this question?



#9 MrkGrismer

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 01:41 PM

If the child has at least one parent who is a Philippine citizen then the child is automatically a Philippine citizen at birth (regardless of where born), you should file a Report of Marriage Abroad with you local Philippine and also get the child a Philippine passport. Then there is no worries about the childs visa needs either.


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#10 Roxas Ron

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 11:48 PM

well i spoke with Maria at the Embassy of the Philippines in Washington D.C. today. She told me because my son has had his "birth abroad" reported and recorded by the NSO he was infact a dual citizen already. because of this he does not qualify for a 13a visa. he should get his philippine passport asap. because we are leaving mid jan 2013 there is not enough time to get the passport back to us. 

 

therefore i am wondering....if we show the "report of birth abroad" to the airlines personal upon boarding will it be necessary for him to have a ticket out of the philippines?



#11 MrkGrismer

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 02:47 PM

What I would do is order the Philippine passport and have the address that it will be sent to be somebody that you trust in the U.S. They can send it to you in the Philippines (or you can pick it up on a visit) once it comes. The child can enter the Philippines on the U.S. passport in the meantime, and have the 'balikbayan stamp'.


If you believe Modern Sporting Rifles have a legitimate use, please like, share and participate on: https://www.facebook...tamateSportsmen

http://www.uscis.gov...0004718190aRCRD
 

Medical Exams – A caller explained that the civil surgeon who completed the medical exam used the wrong form and then wanted to charge an indigent refugee to reprocess the paperwork on the correct form. What recourse does an applicant have if this occurs?

USCIS Response: Customers should notify the Director of their local office when they have a complaint about a civil surgeon.


#12 Roxas Ron

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 05:43 PM

yes i agree...i went ahead and bought us a "throw away ticket to malaysia" just to cover his bases...$67 total for both of us...lol

 

thanks



#13 Tutanes

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 11:32 PM

You should register your son's birth abroad before you leave with the appropriate Philippine Consulate for your area. We made that mistake and tried to register our son here and after mailing the documents we never heard back and they have no record of it. Since we are not going back to the US we have decided to Fedex our documents to a friend back in the US and ask them to send them to the Consulate for us. BTW the Consulate Website states you have one year to register him and after that you may be subject to review (and possible denial I guess) and must submit a reason for why you waited.

 

Also, since I am dealing with this now, one year in the Philippines can turn into a lifetime. So I would suggest getting your police clearance before you leave so you can apply for permanent residency if you want. Otherwise you would have to get it after the fact which is not as easy.      



#14 way-to-go

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 12:02 AM

You should register your son's birth abroad before you leave with the appropriate Philippine Consulate for your area. We made that mistake and tried to register our son here and after mailing the documents we never heard back and they have no record of it. Since we are not going back to the US we have decided to Fedex our documents to a friend back in the US and ask them to send them to the Consulate for us. BTW the Consulate Website states you have one year to register him and after that you may be subject to review (and possible denial I guess) and must submit a reason for why you waited.

 

Also, since I am dealing with this now, one year in the Philippines can turn into a lifetime. So I would suggest getting your police clearance before you leave so you can apply for permanent residency if you want. Otherwise you would have to get it after the fact which is not as easy.      

 

The Philippine Consulate is unlikely to deny the Report of birth. You merely have to include a simple statement  about not registering the child right after giving birth.  I just had a brief & simple explanation about having no knowledge about it & had it notarized in my bank. They accepted it. We did however filed personally when they had an outreach mission close to our city. 








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